Esoteric Library - Contagious Crops
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Category : Gardening - - - - Previous Page

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Contagious Crops

{written by : Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}

Article word count : 564 -- Article Id : 518
Article active date : 2008-09-04 -- Article views : 921


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Article is about :
No matter the amount of information or depth of research done on a plant, it is the experience of going through a season from planting to harvest that enlightens.





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There is probably no better example of Luddites than gardeners. Mechanization has given us weed eaters, powered tillers, and tractors. For the average gardener weeds are still pulled by hand, the soil turned with a garden fork or shovel and by owning a tractor and using it, one is more aptly designated a farmer.

The changes in implements have been incremental. The Anazazi in this area 800 years ago used the same form of hoe we have today only with a stone head at the end of a wooden handle instead of a metal one.

And, though we have seen hypodermic shaped seeders used for small seeds like carrots, we still use our hands and fingers to place seeds into starter trays or into the ground after the danger of frost has passed. Indoor starts that have been transplanted into larger pots line our windowsills to capture the sunlight rather than using some form of artificial lighting.

Each year the stored collective of information in the gardener’s head is retrieved and reviewed for the season’s initiation. Garden journals can be of great use in giving more exact detail of facts needed to be taken into consideration: first and last frost dates, amount of rain, or lack of it; seed varieties that not only started well but also finished as desired; planting dates; problems encountered; pests and what organic controls were used for them.

We are not collectively far from the times of transferring information gained by practical experience through an oral tradition. Books and magazines are the transfer medium for most gardeners these days. But this medium of paper is giving way to an electronic medium, that of the internet. One constant in this shifting of information availability is the experience of the gardener. No matter the amount of information or depth of research done on a plant, it is the experience of going through a season from planting to harvest that enlightens.

There is a saying that new technologies equal new perceptions. If so, what new perceptions of gardening has technology given, considering its limited advances and usages?

One of the sure signs of spring around us in this area of New Mexico are the billows of pollen that rise from the one-seed juniper trees when wind gusts swirling around them sweep off the pollen, now dried by the advancing sun’s warmth. The landscape is often dotted with puffs rising here and there like smoke signals giving the go ahead to those who are watching for signs of time ripeness. These momentary puffs are part of a natural network dynamic.

Gardeners can understand networks as well as anyone, whether it be a network of roots, or how cross-pollination can cause a change in end goals that are evidenced by sometimes strange-shaped and odd tasting squash.

We have exited the stage from oral tradition and are now moving out of the paper medium in which the idea is, “I will search and find information that is important,” to a new paradigm which states that, “If the information is important, it will find me.”

Collective actions within the garden, so well grounded in Luddism, give out the call to harken the messages given by ancient process.

The contagion of unity is within each seed planted, sending to those who are awaiting, the important message that though distance separates us, together we can grow.


Author Bio :
http://www.avant-gardening.com/about

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Other reads from the same category

Pendulistic Progress {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
Fuel for Thought {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
An End of a Beginning {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
Our Common Life {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
A Sustaining Stance {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
Cutting with Occam’s Razor {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
Learning from Necessity {by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo}
Other reads by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo

Pendulistic Progress
Fuel for Thought
An End of a Beginning
Our Common Life
A Sustaining Stance
Cutting with Occam’s Razor
Avant-Gardening: Action-Meditation, Creativity, and Spiritual Growth
Learning from Necessity


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